Showing posts with label Walking Meditation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Walking Meditation. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

WALKING MEDITATION: A Simple Way To Meditate Almost Any Time

Most Westerners think of meditation as someone sitting down, cross legged with their eyes closed and probably chanting some kind of mantra over and over again.

But that is only one of the ways that people can practice meditation.

Meditating can also be performed standing up, lying down or walking.

English: Labyrinth in Lower Leas Country Park ...
Labyrinth in Lower Leas Country Park This is in a country park in between Sandgate and Folkestone, above the seawall promenade. This artwork was designed by Clare Danstead for Shepway District Council for the park. 'As a contribution to peace and harmony within the ever-changing environment and community of Folkestone. The Labyrinth is a uni-cursal pathway leading to a centre and back out again. Used as a form of walking meditation or prayer. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today, we're going to look at walking meditation. In this situation, the walking itself is the focus of your meditation, rather than a candle or a mantra or your breathing.

Obviously, depending on where the walking is taking place, you may also need to be aware of other external influences as well, such as joggers and cyclists.

In a walking meditation, you should concentrate on the actual experience of walking. Notice the pressure on each foot as it touches the ground and the relief of that pressure as your foot rises again. Take in the experience of the muscles in your legs. Notice when they tense up and when they relax. Feel the changes in your toes as they meet the ground. Recognize what is happening to your ankles as you walk along.



As well as the stress relief that a walking meditation naturally brings, you should also experience a feeling of energy and invigoration. Walking is a more active meditation than some other types (although breathing meditations can get pretty energetic as well, if you choose to let them). You also benefit from the exercise of walking, which is an aerobic exercise in itself. It follows that a walking meditation can be of overall benefit to your health and can even help keep you fit.

If the thought of sitting or lying down to meditate has put you off in the past, then taking the walking meditation course could be just the ticket. Give it a try and see how refreshed you feel afterwards!



Sunday, November 27, 2016

Meditation Mastery – Walking Meditation

Walking Meditation
In this meditation method, you will be able to acquire not just the basic knowledge regarding walking meditation, but extreme power to uplift yourself and your inner experience and sensation beyond tradition and definition.

Walking meditation is usually understood as primarily intended to relieve stress in the legs. While it has this effect, this is not the only meaning of kinhin.

During sitting, the legs may turn numb, or 'go to sleep'. This does not mean that the circulation is bad, quite the opposite. There is an old saying in Zen, "A fire that begins in your toes and consumes your whole body"- this is the meaning of this numbness. The smallest thing- even the legs going to sleep- is a subject of investigation in our Zen training.

An ancient questions asks, "can you make your body as limp as a baby's?" When your legs and feet are numb, you will notice that your ankles are usually flexible. Once when I was having private Dokusan with my Zen master, the late Reverend Dr. Soyu Matsuoka-roshi, Archbishop of Soto Zen North America, which consisted to two normal sitting periods of one hour with Kinhin and no talking- both legs had gone completely to sleep by the ending gong. When I stoop up, both feet were absolutely buzzing in my socks. As I stepped to the altar, the toes of my right foot dragged on the carpet, and folded under to where I was partially standing on the top of my foot. I nearly fell down! Sensei caught me. It woke my foot up, but it didn't hurt.

Kinhin is the extension of the stillness of zazen into the action of walking. In your mind, you should strive to eliminate any distinction between the two- they are more alike than different.

There is a famous Zen saying, "Stillness in Action- Action in Stillness". We have this calligraphy by the late Reverend Dr. Soyu Matsuoka-roshi of this expression. It also connotes "Silence is Thunder- Mokurai." This is the more essential meaning of walking meditation- it brings the strength of meditation into the everyday act of walking.
It is also symbolic of the Buddha's walking round and round the bodhi-tree following his Enlightenment. So it likewise represents your 'wandering about in the world of enlightenment', in the words of Dogen-Zenji, the founder of Soto Zen Buddhism, for the first time.

Read more on the E-Book: Meditation Mastery - Walking Meditation
26 pages, $ 1.99

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

WALKING MEDITATION as a Modern Way to a Healthier Life

Meditation has always been associated with solitude, tranquility, and physical inactivity. When one talks of meditation, you may usually come up with a scenario in which a person finds a secluded area, closes his eyes in silence, and rests his body while working his mind out. Does meditation always have to be like this?

Meditation walk
Photo   by magical-world 
Meditation is an art. A method. A skill. A process. It is the art of keeping in touch with yourself, of discovering your entirety and the many facets of your being. It is also a skill that must be developed. It requires discipline and right mindset. You cannot simply think that you will meditate and expect to achieve a result right after. This requires the tuning of one's consciousness. Meditation typically involves a set of procedures and guidelines to be followed. Typically, the success of the activity will depend on the adherence to the given principles and rules.

One interesting form of meditation that deviates from the old and traditional concept is walking meditation. Walking meditation is a lot different from other forms of meditation known to many. For one, you will not have to be physically inactive just to do it. In fact, you need to move and be active – you need to walk! You have to actively engage your mind and your body in this activity in order to experience a holistic positive result. This brings another benefit. Since walking is a daily activity, you can actually grow by meditation everyday!

You also will not have to find a secluded place just so you can meditate. Anywhere will do. Actually, a noisy and crowded place is even encouraged. Here is where the challenge lies. Concentration is important and awareness must be focused. You must not allow the outer world to bind your mind into it – by the things that you see, hear, or whatever you perceive. You may be aware of them, but you must guard not to do anything about them. Do not cling to anything.

The guiding principle behind walking meditation is achieving a balanced awareness, equilibrium, between your inner self and the outer world surrounding you. This meditation will invite you to feel your entire body, all the workings of the parts that make you up, being aware how each of your body parts operates. While doing this, you also have to notice your emotion and your mood. These are all done while you walk. The outside world need not be lost in your focus. There will always be stuffs that will catch your attention as you meditate, and you are not to resist. You are not to hang on to these, though. You have to let them pass by, observing them without doing anything at all.

This is the real sense of awareness. The ideal result of walking meditation is the person's consciousness of the outside world while being completely aware of his inner self. When this is achieved, many of the puzzles and complexities of life will become clearer and simpler. By bridging the gap between what is within and what is out of yourself, you can take full control of your life and enjoy a healthier and a more satisfied lifestyle.