Showing posts with label Martial Arts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Martial Arts. Show all posts

Friday, January 11, 2019

The Art Of HAPKIDO

Hapkido holds many throwing techniques in comm...
Hapkido holds many throwing techniques in common with judo.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
The martial art known as Hapkido is an art of complete self-defense.  Those who study it are more than capable of defending themselves in any type of situation, being more than able to apply their confidence and discipline from the art to enhance their lives, protecting themselves and those that they love as well.

Hapkido teaches students to use minimal force with any stronger opponent.  Contrary to other martial arts, it doesn’t involve strength to execute the techniques.  To control the opponent and take him down, Hapkido focuses on pressure points and the impact they have on opponents.  It also involves a very powerful arsenal of thrusts, spin kicks, and sweeps.  If they are executed properly, the moves from this martial art can be very effective against opponents and attackers.

Along with kicks, punches, and pressure point attacks; Hapkido also uses wrist and joint manipulation locks, along with several throwing techniques. Altogether, there are nearly 300 categories of special movements in Hapkido that involve nearly 3,500 techniques.

Hapkido is a very popular martial art, which is mainly due to the fact that just about anyone, regardless of age or weight can practice the techniques.  The martial art also involves systematic training and stamina exercise, which can improve your health.  You don’t need to be in the best shape either, as Hapkido can actually help your body as well as your health.

Studying Hapkido will also help with developing your muscles, along with your posture, controlling your weight, developing confidence, self-control, even fulfilling your spirit.  Although it is mainly based on self-defense techniques, it also teaches you how to become a better person and get yourself back in health and in touch with your spirit.

Throughout the style, the linear techniques work together to form a solid base in which all of the circular techniques can be perfected.  Everything in Hapkido is tried and tested, in order to come up with a balanced blend of techniques and skills that are apt for any situation.  With Hapkido being a martial art of self-defense, there is a lot of practice involved blocking attacks in many different situations.  This way, the stylist can be more prepared for any situation he finds himself in.



Today, Hapkido is practiced by men and women of all ages, even little children.  It is a very beneficial martial art, one that can be utilized from nearly any position or direction, such as lying, sitting, and standing.  It is an art of self-defense, and can even be deadly if the stylist is proficient with the techniques.  What makes it even more deadly though - is the fact that a lot of people aren’t familiar with it.


Tuesday, December 18, 2018

The Difference Between KARATE and KUNG FU

A karate student wearing a karategi
A karate student wearing a karategi 
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)


For many people, especially those who are not familiar with martial arts, the question often arises on what the difference between karate and kung fu is.  Upon watching somebody doing martial arts, the untrained eye will find it hard to tell whether that person is doing karate or kung fu.  Even those who are beginning martial arts may sometimes be confused about the different styles until further exposure to them will reveal just how different they really are.

Historically, the people living in the islands of Okinawa just south of Japan got exposed to Chinese kung fu martial arts due to the close proximity to China.  Over time, the Okinawans and Japanese developed their own styles of martial arts now known as karate from the original influence of Chinese kung fu.  Although both karate and kung fu utilize many similar martial arts techniques, most kung fu styles will usually have more variety of techniques compared to karate systems.  It’s almost like the Japanese streamlined the number of techniques from Chinese systems to develop karate.  The Japanese also modified the way techniques are executed in karate as they became more linear compared to kung fu.  This is especially evident in the forms or katas (traditional sequence of set moves) where karate techniques are performed with crisp movements that have distinct stop and go motions.  

In kung fu forms, movements involve the use of more circular techniques, particularly with the hands.  These circular motions give kung fu forms a more visually graceful look as techniques seem to flow from one to another.  There is less stop and go with most kung fu styles.  This is why some martial artists, especially in North America, often refer to Chinese kung fu as ‘soft’ styles while karate and tae kwon do are ‘hard’ styles.  This is not to say that hard styles such as karate or tae kwon do are more powerful martial arts than kung fu and other soft styles.  The term ‘soft’ is a bit misleading because the power from circular kung fu moves is often hidden.  Circular moves can generate just as much power as linear ones found in hard styles.   Most kung fu forms are also usually more complex and longer in duration than most karate forms.   To most martial artists, a kung fu form will look much more exotic while a karate form will look more straightforward in terms of martial arts techniques.  Interestingly enough, there are karate styles such as Goju which do have quite a lot of circular techniques similar to kung fu.  Kempo styles are considered a hybrid of Chinese kung fu and Okinawan karate techniques with both circular as well as linear techniques.  There are also many more different styles of kung fu compared to karate.  

A shaolin student doing a kung fu moves. Shaol...
A Shaolin student doing a kung-fu moves.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Martial arts weaponry is found in both kung fu and karate styles but different sets of weapons are utilized in each martial arts system.   Much like the empty hand forms, the kata with karate weapons is also more linear compared to those with kung fu weapons which have more circular movements.  As expected, there is a lot more variety of different Chinese kung fu weapons than found in the Japanese karate styles.
    
Traditionally, practitioners of karate wear a white uniform called a gi which features the overlapping kimono-like top.  Less traditional schools like those in North America will allow colored uniforms.  A colored belt will be the finishing touch to the gi with of course the black belt for those at instructor level ranking.  Most of the time and especially inside a dojo studio, karate stylists will not wear any shoes while training.  Most kung fu stylists will wear a very different looking uniform.  Kung fu uniforms usually consist of tops with Chinese ‘frog-style’ buttons rather than overlapping fronts like the karate gi top.  The uniforms can be black or a variety of colors with often lighter fabrics such as satin and shoes are commonly worn.  The modern acrobatic Chinese martial arts of wushu can feature satin uniforms with many different bright colors.  Many kung fu schools simply utilize t-shirts and baggy pants as uniforms.  Satin colored sashes are often worn to signify rank of students but this is actually more of a North American style as most kung fu schools in Asia do not show rankings in uniforms.

Overall, there’s more variety of techniques, styles, weapons, and uniforms found in the Chinese kung fu systems compared to karate.  However, that is not to say that one system or style of martial art is superior to another.  They are just different and to the observer, it could come down to personal preference.  Some prefer kung fu and some prefer karate.  Some ambitious martial artists who desire a full well-rounded education practice both kung fu and karate.



Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Learning the Sword of TAI CHI

Scott Rodell cutting jian.jpg
"Scott Rodell cutting jian"  Licensed via Wikimedia Commons.
Usually, teachers will give the students sufficient time to practice all the basic moves first before quarrying in the more intense techniques. It will take a student at least 2-3 years of experience before letting him handle the tao (knife or short sword). If the student is really good and has already mastered all arts within a year, then he can be a candidate to learn the tao earlier than expected. 

It will take a student at least 10 years of Tai Chi experience to handle the real thing. Point is, the teachers take their craft very seriously. That is why some hesitate to teach the sword unless they are sure that the person can handle the blade in its essence. It is seldom to encounter a master that teaches the sword because it is a very dangerous thing to learn especially if the person in not really equipped to learn it. Some will not teach it at all.

That was before. In this generation, there are a lot of teachers that allow the students to learn the way of the sword, instantly, after knowing the basic of Tai Chi. As a sort of progression first, they would teach the students the basic things like standing meditation. Push Hands will come next. There would also be some specific moves like the Tchoung style in its fast form. Practicing these conveys a solid foundation of the techniques and movements of the body.

Weapons will be introduced. They have varieties of teachings regarding swords like tao, chien, etc. After mastering the independent use of the swords, they would continue to practice but this time, in twos. Practitioners will arrange the sword patterns then comes the moment of sparring.

When chien is used in sparring, it is like practicing Push Hands with a weapon. Similar circular movements are the ones that are used to nick, thrust, slice and cut. Chopping movements can be found in tao but not in chien applications. 

Concepts
Every type of martial art revolves around concepts. An art’s methods of training must always reflect the concepts and must see to it that every movement is in harmony with the entire faculty. In Tai Chi sword, there are specifications, that wouldn’t be a surprise. Sadly, the stiff and wooden way that is taught by some instructors doesn’t reflect the energy predicted in Tai Chi.

Tai Chi Chuan derives its concepts from several forms of performing the chien single-handedly. Yang style is the most common form. It is composed of 56 – 64 movements. The variations of the standard pattern will greatly depend on the school of thought and the emphasis of each one.


During the practice of the sword, a person must focus on the smoothness and calmness of the movement. The mind should be as calm as the quiet ocean to be able to reflect the innermost feeling of a person. The body must stay afloat like sailing into clear skies.

One of the reasons why people study the art of the sword is because the weapon brings the elements of the mind and the body in unity. To use the sword correctly, one must assume that is it a part of his body and not just a weapon of destruction.

He must realize that the sword is a matter of importance that when taken away is a bigger ordeal.



Friday, October 19, 2018

When the World Turns VIOLENT!

Art of Shaolin Kung Fu
Photo  by kevinpoh 
ITS DANGEROUS OUT THERE

It is dangerous out there and especially for you.

The enemy may be next door and you don't know it but you got to have the guts to look. What can you really do once you see some violence or get scared or worse because you receive a bashing or king hit - do you hide in your house?

The danger today is maybe not too obvious to you but you better hone your sensors or you'll get hit without seeing it coming. 


You know that given a situation to be a hero and stop a crime, terrorism or violence you'll be able to step up or chase after them etc - or maybe you'll cower or be the victim. 

TV today scares the shiit out of many people as it promotes violence and turns the meek yellow and nervous. 

Were are you on the scared meter of life? Are you out there amongst it or a bit of a shy body or house mummy's boy? 


PHYSICAL COMPETENCE

Have you ever seen raw bloodlust or someone getting 'owned'? Just search google for "martial street fights" - "martial owned" Watch those movies and cringe!!!

Kung Fu, Boxing, dancing, ballet, incompetence? What will you display to your attacker?

Today we are lazy, probably fat too. Go look in the mirror and skip for ten minutes, then check your image again and what do you see?


I can judge I am probably half the strength and endurance form 10 years ago, how about you?

Can you throw a punch or even stand steady on one leg? can you do a round-house or even give a kick to the knee? Ever heard of a combination?

MARTIAL KNOWLEDGE

a martial art is defined as - 
1 : of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior
2 : relating to an army or to military life
3 : experienced in or inclined to war : WARLIKE

a martial art is defined as: 
various forms of self-defense,
usually weaponless,
based on techniques developed in ancient China, India, and Tibet.

If you’ve never studied a martial art, your awareness of the most likely starts at Bruce Lee movies and ends with the stylized theatrics of The Matrix. If that’s the case, you may not realize from what you’ve gleaned onscreen that there are an estimated 200 unique kinds of martial arts, and within these, thousands of different styles. Karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do are among the most popular and well-known of the martial arts in the U.S., but there are numerous others.

Despite the array of martial arts and styles, most of them share common techniques, and so they can be organized into broad categories that facilitate understanding. The primary way of classifying martial arts is by the basic physical technique they use: striking or grappling.

Do you even know the difference between kung fu and karate? Do you think wing chun is a Chinese dish?

Or a combination of triangles with small circles as can be seen in Chinese trapping, wrist locks or Aikido entry and endings.

Because karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do have been more prominent than other forms in popular culture, from film to sporting events, many people mistakenly believe that all martial arts are Asian in origin. In fact, diverse cultures throughout history from Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East have also given birth to their own martial art forms.

The different styles can even be related to shapes or geometry - squares, triangles and circles.

MARTIAL TRAINING TO LIVE

Training is hard..really hard. The hardest is to get started and its down-hill easy from there. What you need is a martial arts machine - something new and exciting to get you off your fat ass.

Everyone knows someone who knows how to fight - with fists, knives, weapons, guns, tactical, senseless, whatever but START!

What's important now is to do something, start with brief exercise, get into stretching, shadow box, then step up and train hard.

GO to the local phone book and look up kung fu or karate. Then give them a call, go along or take your kid.

CONCLUSION IS ACTION

Life is not scary but maybe your lack of skill, self-confidence and personal competence is making you afraid.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

If you are not liking what you see in the mirror, afraid to go down a dark street, scared of a potential confrontation then train now.

We can't all be Bruce Lee but you also don't want to be an emotional and physical punching bag do you?

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.


Thursday, September 20, 2018

MARTIAL ARTS Training: More Than Just Self-Defense

The "Manly art of self-defense" Newsboys' Protective Association.  Location: Cincinnati, Ohio. (LOC)
Photo  by The Library of Congress
According to the FBI, four women die every day as a result of domestic violence and about 130,000 women report that they’ve been victims of rape or attempted rape annually.  Because of statistics like this, many women enroll in self-defense classes to learn the skills they need to defend themselves.  

The thing is, a short-term self-defense class may not address all of the areas you need to be able to fully defend yourself.  While martial arts classes won’t specifically train you for combat and fighting, they will give you the ability to defend yourself if you ever find yourself in a situation where you need to practice self-defense.  The best part is that this self-defense isn’t always physical.  What most people don’t know is that in a good martial arts class you’ll learn a variety of skills to help you gain the awareness, peace and physical conditioning you need to be a stronger person, in all aspects of your life.

Confidence.  All the physical defense skills in the world won’t help if you don’t have the confidence needed to use them.  That’s the beauty of martial arts training.  In order to successfully train a martial art, you need to have your mind and body in tune with one another.  This self-awareness gives you the confidence you need to control and defend yourself if needed.  You’ll be able to handle everyday and extraordinary situations without losing your temper.  You’ll be able to stand your ground.  You’ll appear to be (and will be) more confident – and people who appear to be confident are less likely to be the victims of violence because they don’t look like “easy targets”.

Focus and Awareness.  While training martial arts, you need to focus and concentrate on what you are doing so that you don’t injure yourself or those around you.  This focus and concentration carry over into other aspects of your life as well.  Soon, you’ll find yourself better able to concentrate on work, school, and home.  You’ll even find yourself being more aware of your surroundings which can help you avoid potentially harmful or violent situations.

Peace.  Training martial arts will also give you an inner peace that can change your life.  First of all, to effectively train martial arts, your workout will always be changing. You’ll never get bored with your workout because it will always be challenging to your abilities (both physical and mental).  In addition to that, training martial arts is a great stress reducer.  You probably already know that regular physical exercise can reduce physical stress, but what you don’t know is that martial arts go one step further to reduce emotional stress as well.  Activities such as martial arts that require you concentrate on your movements and your core strength can give you full stress relief in one activity.





Strength and Conditioning.  When you train martial arts, you use your entire body.  You cannot use just one muscle set at a time.  The exercises are always changing and evolving to give you the maximum out of each training session.  Martial arts also increase your flexibility which is great because people who are flexible suffer fewer injuries, have better posture and are better able to relax their muscles.

Also, please see our web pages at www.kungfutemple.com and www.martialarts-instruction.com

Sincerely,

Robert Jones
Master Instructor
6th Degree Black Belt
Owner, the Academy of Kempo Martial Arts



Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Knowing the basics of AIKIDO

Ueshiba in Tokyo in 1939 - Photo: Wikipedia
Aikido is one of the oldest forms of martial arts. Founded by Morihei Ueshiba, aikido came about through the studies of many different kinds of traditional martial arts. In fact, is often perceived as a form of exercise or a dance because of some of its forms. It is also viewed by some quarters as some form of martial mesmerism.

Aikido is even confused with Daito Ryu Aikijutsu, it is different in its essence. Still, its founder attributed his creation of aikido to the way, his master Sokaku Takeda, grandmaster of Daito Ryu, opened his eyes to the nature of Budo.

What is aikido?

Despite its many perceived forms, aikido is a Budo or martial arts. It is the refinement of the techniques that are being taught in traditional martial arts and is combined with a philosophy that calls on for the power of the spirit. In its essence, it is a blending of the body and the mind.

Its philosophy is basically derived from the belief that deceptions and trickery or brute force will not make us defeat our opponents. Instead, a concentration that involves the spirit will be enough to strengthen us.

Aikido is also used as a way to discover our true paths so that we can develop our individuality. It also teaches its practitioners to unify their body and their mind so that they will become in harmony with the “universe” and with nature. Their power and their strength will come from this balance and harmony.  

The word “universe” in aikido is not some obscure concept that one cannot achieve. It is actually quite concrete and is even within the grasp of the person. In aikido, “universe” can be achieved through actual experiences and everyday life.

Aikido’s movements and techniques are circular. When a circle is created in aikido, the person is said to be protected from a collision from an opposing force. A firm centre, however, is needed to create this circle. An example of a firm circle is a spinning top that turns at a fast speed. Without a firm centre, the speed of movement will only create an imbalance. The stillness of the spinning top while in speeding motion is what is called sumikiri in Aikido language. This is achieved only by what Aikido founder calls “total clarity of mind and body.” However, this is not so easily achieved. It takes a long time of study and practice in order to find this intense concentration and centeredness.


Training is important in aikido as well as concentration because while it may be easy to create a centred being when inside a martial arts gym, the same cannot be said of situations and circumstances outside. It will not be easy to keep one’s composure when faced with extraordinary circumstances. This is actually one of the goals of Aikido training. It aims to teach its practitioners to maintain their composure and their centeredness even in panic situations such as danger and calamities.      

One method taught in aikido is to breathe with what is called the seika tanden point. This is the part of the body that can be found two inches below the navel. Controlled breathing is one key to being one with the universe and to centre oneself with nature. When a person learns to do this, he or she will feel the extraordinary calmness that they can use in the practice of aikido.



Saturday, July 21, 2018

The Belt Colors Of TAEKWONDO

English: Rhee Tae Kwon-Do 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Da...
Rhee Tae Kwon-Do 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Dan black belts  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The belts and their colors that are used with Taekwondo aren't just a random assortment of colors that are used to separate the ranks in the martial art.  In Taekwondo, each belt color has a meaning that lets fighters known about their advancement and increasing knowledge.  Belts are also great for the stylist, as they let the stylist know just how far they have progressed.

The colors of the belts found in Taekwondo vary, as they represent the advancement of rank, as well as the growth of the student.  It can take a long time for students to move up the ranks, all depending on their knowledge and how quite they adapt to the techniques and forms of the art.

Below, are the colors and belts of Taekwondo, along with their meaning.

White belt
A white belt is the symbol of birth or the beginning for the stylist.  Students that wear white belts are just starting out, searching for the knowledge to continue Taekwondo.

Yellow belt
A yellow belt is the first ray of light that shines on the student, giving them new strength to the Taekwondo martial art.  Students that have yellow belts have taken a great step in learning, and have opened their mind to new techniques.

Green belt
A green belt is the symbol of growth or a seed as it sprouts from the ground and begins to grow into a plant.  Students with green belts are continuing along the path of Taekwondo, learning to develop further and redefine every technique they have been taught.

Blue belt
A blue belt represents a blue sky, with the plant continuing to grow upwards, heading for the sky.  Students with blue belts continue to move higher in ranks, as the plant continues to grow taller.  Students at this stage will also be given additional knowledge of Taekwondo so that their mind and body can continue to grow and develop.


Red belt
The red belt is the heat of the sun, with the plant continuing the path upwards toward the sun.  Students that possess red belts are higher in rank, as they have acquired a lot of the knowledge in the art of Taekwondo.  Red belts also tell the students to be cautious, as they gain more knowledge and their physical techniques increase.

Black belt
A black belt is the best of the best.  It symbolizes the darkness that is out there beyond the light of the sun.  Once the student is given a black belt and begins to train other students, he will teach all that has been taught to him.  Black belts recognize the best students, as they continue to teach others the art of Taekwondo, and continue the never-ending cycle of training.


Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Training with Martial Arts Weapons - KARATE KUNG FU Weaponry

English: Martial arts weapon.
Martial arts weapon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
There are opportunities in martial arts training to learn to use various martial arts weapons.  Many martial arts schools, especially those that teach Japanese karate and Chinese kung fu styles have weaponry as part of their overall curriculum.  Popular weapons from karate systems include the bo staff, kama, sai, sword, nunchaku, and tonfa.  Chinese kung fu styles have a broadsword, 3 section staff, kwan do, whip chain, butterfly knives as well as their own versions of staff.  Of course, there are many other types of weapons in martial arts but the above are the more common ones taught.  

Some of the more exotic weapons include the fan, rope dart, and the hook swords.  Martial arts weapons can be divided into short and long range.  An example of a short range weapon would be a pair of sai.  The bo staff would be a long range weapon because of the longer reach.  Weapons can also be divided into bladed and non-bladed.  Kamas and swords, of course, would be bladed weapons where staffs and nunchakus would be non-bladed.  In most training situations with bladed weapons, the blades are not live.  That is, the blades of swords and kamas are blunt rather than sharp.  This adds to the safety aspect of martial arts weapons training.  Weapons can also come in different weights from heavy traditional models down to ultra-lightweight versions for forms competition.  

Martial arts weapons are considered as extensions of a martial artist’s own body.  For example, strikes with a weapon are really extended hand strikes.  Blocks with weapons are modeled after traditional martial art blocking techniques.  Therefore, it is important for martial arts students to be relatively proficient with martial arts techniques using their own bodies first before learning to use any martial arts weapon.  This will help the students understand the applications behind each weapons technique much better.  In most Japanese karate schools, weapons training won’t be offered until students reach an intermediate level such as a green or blue belt.  There are martial arts that are strictly weapons oriented.  An example is a Japanese kendo which is modeled after samurai sword fighting.  Philipino arnis is stick fighting which was developed in the South Pacific islands.  

There are many benefits in training with martial arts weapons.  Because most weapons have some weight to them, their use will help develop muscle tone and strength.  Performing forms or katas with weapons will also develop coordination.  In today’s world, martial arts weapons may not be as practical as the days of the past when it was acceptable to carry weapons wherever one traveled.  However, with some understanding of weapons techniques, a martial artist today can turn almost any household item such as an umbrella, cane or even a set of keys into weapons of self-defense if required.  Another important point that shouldn’t be ignored is that most practitioners will claim that training with martial arts weapons is a lot of fun.  


However, not all martial arts clubs and studios will teach weapons.  Many tae kwon do schools, for example, do not include weapons in their overall training.  This is not to say that Korean martial arts do not have weapons.  The Korean martial art kuk sool won features the staff, sword, and cane.  So if a martial arts student wishes to learn the use of weapons, a school that includes them in their training should be sought after.  Another alternative for students who are otherwise happy with their martial arts club that doesn’t have weapons training is to get supplementary private instruction from instructors who can provide it.

Weapons training can open up a whole new dimension to overall martial arts training.  Even advanced tai chi practitioners use swords in some of their forms.  It doesn’t matter if sometimes the swords are made entirely of wood either since the actual weapons techniques will still be used in the forms.  For many martial arts competitors, weapons forms are their favorite divisions to compete in.  From a spectator point of view, weapons forms can be very exciting to watch especially when weapons such as whip chains or kamas with strings are used since their presentations are so dynamic and even somewhat dangerous to the user.   Such weapons have caused injuries to users when certain techniques were sloppy or mistimed.  But like other aspects of martial arts, proficiency with a martial art weapon after much hard training can bring a high sense of satisfaction to a martial artist.



Friday, May 25, 2018

An In Depth Look At MUAY THAI

English: High kick in muay thai.
High kick in muay thai. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Also known around the world as Thai boxing, Muay Thai is an ancient art of self defense that was created and tested in battle by the fearless warriors of ancient Thailand.  Today, Muay Thai is used all around the world.  The United States Navy SEALs, Thai military, and even the CIA takes full advantage of the devastating and bone crushing techniques this martial art offers.

Unlike other martial arts, students of Thai don’t earn belts for their skills and their progression.  Instead, their skills are tested in the ring.  Since Thai fighting first began, the only things that the fighters themselves are interested in are the championship belts which showcase their dominance in Muay Thai fighting.

The skills that are taught with Muay Thai are far more dominant to other striking based martial arts.  Muay Thai uses very little grappling, but focuses more on crushing kicks, punches, and bone shattering elbows.  Students of Thai fighting can often take an opponent down with just one shot, often times breaking bones and sometimes even killing them with just one lethal kick or elbow.

The reason why Muay Thai didn’t utilize ground grappling or submission holds is because it was developed in ancient battlegrounds where there were always multiple attackers.  These attackers were knowledgeable in sword fighting skills, which made the need for a dependable martial art more or less a necessity.

Muay Thai used swords, spears, sticks, and hard strikes.  In this type of environment, you didn’t want the fight to go to the ground.  The strikes and weapon movements needed be fast, hard, and very precise.  With these types of conditions and the type of environment, Muay Thai needed be a very fast responsive martial art with an excellent weapons system.

Even though grappling and submissions were planned for Muay Thai, the martial art became more of a ring sport before grappling could be implemented.  With Thai originally being a martial art for striking purposes, a lot of martial artists have started using the techniques that have been proven time and time again with time boxing.

Although there are other martial arts that put a lot of emphasis on striking, Muay Thai is quite different.  The first area in which Muay Thai differs is the effective use of both elbows and knees.  The elbows and knees that are used with most Thai techniques are feared all around the world by boxers and other stylists.



Kicking and kneeing is the main objects in Muay Thai.  In order to become efficient with kicking, the shins need to be conditioned - which can be quite painful.  Once the Thai stylist has conditioned the nerves in his shins for impact, the shins can be used just like a club or a baseball bat.  This is something you should really see for yourself in action - as the sound of the impact alone can send chills down your back.

Through years of training and conditioning, Muay Thai fighters can become lethal and deadly weapons.  A properly trained fighter can make deadly impact, meaning that his knees, shins, and elbows are quite possibly deadlier than a gun or other type of weapon.  For this very reason - Muay Thai is one of the deadliest and most feared martial arts in the world.

All in all, Muay Thai is a great martial art for defense and competition.  Thai is one of the best martial arts in the world, proving it time and time again - in both ancient times and anytime it is used today


Friday, April 13, 2018

History And Fundamentals Of KARATE

Karate training in Shuri Castle
Karate training in Shuri Castle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
History:

Though Karate is often associated with Japanese martial arts, its true origin dwells in Okinawan combat techniques and Southern Chinese martial arts. It is basically a fusion of both arts and was introduced to Japan only in 1921. During this period, Karate was simply known as "Te", or hand, as called by the Okinawans. Chinese influence is evident in the original symbol for Karate - the "Tang Hand" or “Chinese Hand”.

There were no specified or concrete Karate styles in the early days and simply generalized as Shuri-te, Naha-te, and Tomari-te, named after the three cities in which they were formed. Each city had its own methods, principles, system, and traditions of Karate.

The introduction, popularization, and modernization of Karate to Japan are mainly credited to Funakoshi, an Okinawan master, venerably regarded by many practitioners as “The Father of Modern Karate”. Other prominent Karate experts in his time include Kenwa Mabuni, Miyagi Chojun, Choshin Chibana, and Motobu Choki.

Japan began introducing Karate as a subject in schools before the Second World War and soldiers in the army were often trained in the discipline. Competitions and different styles also started emerging as several universities started karate club programs during this period.

The popularization of Karate in the West has its roots in the American military occupation of Japan and Okinawa after the Second World War and Japanese immigration to the United States.

Fundamentals of Karate:

Karate mainly stresses on volatile combat techniques such as punching, kicking, knee and elbow strikes, and open hand methods. Grappling, joint manipulations, locks, restraints, throwing, and vital point striking are also parts of this discipline.

Karate training is divided into three main sections –

• Kihon refers to the study of basic techniques, movements, and components
• Kata or 'form', a fixed sequence of moves, is a series of movements and techniques linked together by the combative principles that the kata expresses.
• Kumite or 'sparring' evolved from well-defined kata to open attack and defense.



The Uniform – Color of the Belt and Ranks:

The Karate uniform is white and comprised of the Kimono (shirt), Dogi or Keikogi (pants) and a belt (white or colored), a combination introduced by Jigoro Kano, the founder of Judo. The color of the belt is dependant on the rank and expertise of a practitioner. In accordance with commonly held standards, white belts are for beginners, and black for the highest rank. This, however, may differ from one organization to another. Each rank may also have subdivisions of its own even if the color of the belt is similar.

Styles and Variations:

Karate styles can be broadly classified into Traditional and Full Body Karate. Traditional styles are those that developed in the early period of the 20th century and include variants such as Shotokan, Goju-ryu, Wado-ryu, Shito-ryu, Kushin-ryu, and Shindo Jinen Ryu. Full contact karate includes styles such as Kyokushin-kaikan and Kansuiryu. Many of the styles have offshoots that developed into styles of their own. Although the concepts remain universal, each representation differs from one another.



Saturday, March 31, 2018

The Martialarm Introduction To CHOY-LI-FUT

Members of the Buk Sing Choy Lay Fut Kung Fu A...
Members of the Buk Sing Choy Lay Fut Kung Fu Association from Fremont, California perform a lion dance to welcome the torch's arrival in Justin Herman Plaza.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Choy-Li-Fut is a popular Southern variety of kung-fu in which the opponents oppose from some distance, which necessitates of each the proficient and expert development of long-hand abilities, as well as firm and a solid grounding in the body, though the feet must be versatile. The arms are wielded freely and powerfully in a variety of styles: uppercuts, backfists, roundhouses, and overhead foreknuckle thrusts. The Baat Gaw land, willow leaf double swords, and 18 staff can be used in the aggressive kung-fu variety.

As a Southern Shaolin style with Five Animal techniques, Hung Kuen is a close relative of Choi Lei Fut and is said by some Choi Lei Fut branches to be the variety that Chan Yuen-Wu taught founder Chan Heung.

Choi Lei Fut is a characterized as a "soft-hard", "external" variety. The curriculum was designed so that anti-Qing rebels may perhaps concisely gain feasible proficiency and still incorporates a wide range of weapons. Several frequent movements have specific sounds interrelated with them for example, "sik" when throwing punches, "yik" when punching from horse riding stance, "wah" was used when using a Tiger Claw and "dik" when kicking hypothetically so that friendly forces may perhaps recognize each other in battle and to force the practitioner to coordinate his breathing habits with his movements.

Choy Lay Fut training could be done in any city in the world and I call you to visit out martial arts directory of Choy Lay Fut to find a school near you!

Depending on the branch of Choi Lei Fut, Choi Fook is said to have been a master either of Southern Shaolin Kung Fu from Fujian province, he was not related to which was started by Choi Gau-Yee and is cited to have the longest range of the five major family styles of the southern Chinese martial arts.

Lei Yau-San, cited to be a student of Jee Sin while others admit him to be a student of Li Sik Hoi-one of the 5 Ancestors of the Hung Mun, Lei Yau-San is known not only as a teacher of Chan Heung, and later discovered of Jeung Hung Sing as well, but as the founder of Lei Ga which, like Choi Ga, is one of the five major family styles of the southern Chinese martial arts.

Fut Ga literally "Buddha family," specializes in palm techniques and for this reason is also known as Buddha family Palm, Buddhist Palm, or Buddha Palm. Monk Ching Cho Woh Seung was responsible for spreading the Fut Ga procedure all over Guandong. Both the left and apt hand are used in attack and defense. Long and short-range footwork is employed.




Tuesday, March 20, 2018

A Look At KUNG FU

Students of Shaolin Kung Fu school perform ren...
Students of Shaolin Kung Fu school perform renowned shaolin kungfu (martial art).
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The martial art of Kung Fu is an exchange of culture, a type of exercise, and also a way of defending yourself.  The art is very popular throughout the world, also being known as Gung Fu, Wu Shu, and even Kuo Shu.  It shares some common traits with Karate, such as using both hand and foot techniques.  Kung Fu is one of the most popular forms of martial arts - and also one of the oldest.

Within Kung Fu, there are several styles and variances, although the most popular are those that have their roots in the well known Shaolin Temple.  What most people aren’t aware of however, is the fact that Kung Fu was practiced in China years before the first Shaolin temple was even though of.

A majority of martial arts enthusiasts think of self defense as being the ultimate goal of any martial art, including Kung Fu.  While self defense is involved with Kung Fu, the martial is so much more than just fighting and defense - it is a true art, one that develops the mind, body, and the soul.

Kung Fu doesn’t teach students to overcome others, as it teaches students to look within themselves and learn to have complete and total control over their emotions.  Kung Fu is an art of harmony, that teaches to students to remain at peace and avoid confrontations.  If a situation threatens bodily harm to the student, then he must rise to the occasion - becoming the warrior and defending himself.

Just like other types of martial arts, Kung Fun teaches the balance that is crucial for executing techniques and the proper movement.  The basic concept behind the balance is that same balance that the Chinese believe keeps the balance between heaven and earth.  This concept of balance can be achieved by students if they completely focus their thoughts and empty their minds free from any type of distractions.

Kung Fu is a martial art that can be learned by anyone.  It does take a strong desire, just like any other martial art.  It has a rich heritage, and a proud legacy.  Kung Fu is indeed a deadly martial art, if used in the wrong ways.  There are variations of Kung Fu as well, which include the infamous five animals - Tiger, Dragon, Eagle Claw, Crane, and the Snake. 

Adapted by the animals in which they are named after, the five animals style is some of the most impressive in martial arts.  Tiger Claw is by far the deadliest of the five animals, teaching students to strike just like the dreaded tiger.  This style teaches the student power in his hands, so that when he strikes, he tears the flesh.  Tiger Claw is very deadly, although it is very hard to find instructors that teach this style now days.



Unlike other martial arts, there really are no competitions for Kung Fu.  Stylists can compete it other competitions, although there really aren’t any that are for only Kung Fu.  It is an ancient martial art, that is to be used only in instances were there is no other option than to fight back.  When provoked, the stylist should try everything he or she can to avoid confrontations.

Kung Fu aims to teach the lessons of respect, fairness to others, harmony of the spirit, and total self control no matter what.  These characteristics, when paired together, allow students to achieve success in a hard to deal with society.  Kung Fu is all about developing the student’s overall well being - and following the straight path to mental and physical toughness.


Thursday, February 22, 2018

The Art Of SHOOTFIGHTING

Although it can be a very provocative martial art, Shootfighting is still one of the most popular martial arts styles in the world.  The art of Shootfighting is very old, originating from Japan as a way of self-defense.  Even though it is great to use for self-defense purposes, this martial art is more popular as a ring sport in competitions such as the Vale Tudo and the professional Shootfighting leagues found throughout Japan.

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In Japan, Shootfighting is a sport that is very popular.  The bouts take place in a ring that is similar to wrestling, ropes and all intact.  There are normally rounds, as well as a referee who is there to call the bout and stop it if need be.  Fighters will wear gloves and go at it full contact.  Submission and grappling are legal as well, which makes the fights more interesting.  Fighters can test their skills in Shootfighting against some of the best Japan has to offer with these bouts.

Shootfighting is popular in the United States as well, although it is more popular throughout Japan.  There are American fighters such as Ken Shamrock and Bart Vale who are experts in Shootfighting and travel to Japan on a frequent basis to compete in tournaments and bouts.  The atmosphere in Japan is very high, as they show a lot of passion and desire for the matches over there.

In technique and form, Shootfighting is a mix of striking and grappling.  It teaches students to be prepared for anything, standing or on the ground.  There are a lot of bone breaking moves taught with this art, from arm locks to ankle locks.  Most of the techniques that are taught to the student use a mixture of strength and technique - bringing very drastic results.

Even though a lot of people classify Shootfighting as being a form of pit fighting, it is actually quite a bit more.  Shootfighting does incorporate a lot of stand up fighting, in the form of punches, elbows, and kicks.  On their feet or on the ground, stylists can execute moves that will end a fight quickly.  The submission locks are the deadliest forms of defense and attack with this martial art, as they target a specific limb and focus on breaking it in two.


As a martial art, Shootfighting is very hard to beat.  It teaches students to be aggressive in battle and end the fight as quickly as possible.  It also teaches students self-control and self-esteem as well.  There are no belt classes with Shootfighting, as it is more or less a self-defense system that was originally designed for the streets.  It has proven to be very effective over the years, both on the streets and in competition.



Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Basics Of TAE KWON DO

Tae Kwon Do uniform
Photo  by Johnragai-Moment Catcher 
Tae Kwon Do is a modern martial art, well known all around the world for its lightning fast, often high, spectacular spin kicks.  Tae Kwon Do has been around for many years, originally founded in Korea.  It translates to “they are of punching and kicking”, or the “art of unarmed combat”.

The martial art Tae Kwon Do has four disciplines - patterns, self-defense, break test and sparring.  It isn’t just one of these disciplines that make up the art, but a combination of them.  All 4 of them are important, especially for those looking to advance in belt ranking.  To advance in a belt, there are certain tests that students need to pass.

One of the great things about Tae Kwon Do is the fact that there are no age limits, and it can easily be learned by young children.  Children of all ages will quickly learn fast reactions playing games, learn respect, and they will also learn their abilities as well as their disabilities.

The competitions, however, are a bit different for children than they are for the adults.  Even though the participants will wear full body protection, children can only kick and punch to the body, as no shots to the head are allowed.  The competitions in Tae Kwon Do is what makes the art so very dominating.  A majority of students that practice this martial art do so because of the competitions.

The competitions can be very exciting to watch, as they can get very competitive.  Contrary to what many may think, the competitions aren’t deadly, nor are they anywhere close to being as dangerous as Muay Thai fights.  Competitors will wear full protection, including headgear.  For adults, kicks to the head are allowed, although a majority of stylists can block them before they make an impact.


In order to participate in the competitions, stylists will need to have a certain level of experience.  It can take years to become good enough, especially for those who win.  Competitions are a great way to learn, especially if there are participating fighters from other areas of the world.  The skill of a stylist is a very important factor with the competitions and tournaments.  If you have a black belt fighter going against a white belt - the results will normally be quite obvious.

All things aside, the art of Tae Kwon Do is a great martial art.  Stylists can learn kicking, punching, blocking, and the spectacular movements the art is known for.  Tae Kwon Do is practiced all around the world, meaning that there are just as many places to learn this art as there is Karate.  For an art that won’t disappoint - Tae Kwon Do teaches self-defense and a whole lot more.